Saving Seeds: It Just Makes Sense

Saving seeds as an act of societal justice. Are you a seed saver? If so, then you are part of a larger global movement saving heirloom and open-pollinated seeds under threat of extinction (largely as a result of industrialized agriculture and multinational agrochemical corporations closing in on controlling the majority of seed supply companies). Aside from fighting the good fight, we really cherish seed collecting at 7 Acre Wood. It not only connects us back to our gardening ancestors, but also connects us to future generations.  

Saving seeds makes economic sense. Saving seeds saves money. Thanks to the exponential production of seeds produced in each flower head, you’ll have plenty of seeds to share with other members of the garden club. You’ll recognize this savings when you can cross off seeds from your list of things to purchase for the 2019 gardening season. 

Saving seeds makes environmental sense. Recent research indicates that during this time of the years, flowers in your garden activate important bits of information in their seeds to give their offspring a “jump start” in growing your garden next year. For example, if your flowers have been activating specific genes to help them deal with soil challenges, the resultant seeds will germinate next year already primed and ready to deal with those same challenges faced by their parents. By seed sharing, we’re growing flowers that are better suited to grow in Bath County as compared to seeds produced from flowers from some other region in North America. 

Saving seeds uses common sense. The process for saving seeds is straight forward; simply collect, clean (sorting seeds from fruit or residual flower parts), dry and store. Don’t be shy about trying; deep down inside we all have the innate knowledge to save seeds. That little voice inside of you will guide you through the process. We like to store our seeds in small paper lunch bags, placed inside of metal trash cans in an outbuilding so the seeds can experience cold temperatures. 

Saving seeds makes good health sense. Traditional vegetable plant varieties typically produce more nutrient dense food than hybrid commercial varieties that have been bred for high yields and to be responsive to pesticides and fertilizers. 

Supporting seed savers makes ethical sense. Supporting local and regional seed-saving groups strengthens the network of seed savers and preserves plant diversity for future generations. Ask Rhonda at the Warm Springs library how you can assist in her development of a seed-saving library. For more information on seed saving, contact the Seed Savers Exchange (www.seedsavers.org). Better yet, join this important organization and “stick it” to those greedy multinational agrochemical companies!

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